Common and cut-leaved teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris and Dipsacus laciniatus) are short-lived perennials that originated in Europe.
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Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) is a woody vine introduced from eastern Asia in the 1860s as an ornamental plant. It is typically found in old homesites, forested edges, woodlands, successional fields, and hedgerows.
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Honeysuckles, such as amur (Lonicera maackii) and common fly (Lonicera X muendeniensis) honeysuckle, originated in Eurasia as ornamental shrubs.
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Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is a biennial forb that originated in Europe.
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Crown Vetch (Coronilla varia) is perennial plant in the legume family from Eurasia that was introduced to the United States in the 1950’s for erosion control. Its creeping stems can reach two to six feet in length.
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Common and glossy buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica and Rhamnus frangula) originated in Eurasia as ornamental shrubs.
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Bird’s Foot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) is a perennial plant in the legume family from Eurasia. The flowers – bright yellow and often with fine red lines – develop into small pea-like pods.
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Buckthorn

Image © Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org

Common and glossy buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica and Rhamnus frangula) originated in Eurasia as ornamental shrubs.

Both have purple-black fruits and oval or oblong dark green leaves. Both can reach 20 feet tall.

Common buckthorn is found in disturbed forests and abandoned fields and along roadsides, fencerows and the edges of prairies. Glossy buckthorn is found in wetlands, sedge meadows and mesic uplands. Both are spread by birds that eat the fruits, which are strong laxatives, and disperse the seeds.

Because buckthorn grows quickly, it robs soils of moisture and nutrients. The resulting bare soil is susceptible to erosion and is uninhabitable by most wildlife. Buckthorn also spreads quickly and is one of the first plants to leaf out in the spring and one of the last ones to drop its leaves in the fall. These factors allow it to create low, dense canopies that prevent sunlight from reaching native shrubs, young trees, wildflowers and other groundcover below. This allows buckthorn to effectively smother native vegetation.

Buckthorn roots are shallow, so gardeners can dig out or pull small to medium-sized plants, preferably in spring when the soil is moist.

Research findings released May 1, 2013 by Lincoln Park Zoo and Northern Illinois University concluded that invasive European buckthorn, common in the DuPage County area, contributes to amphibian decline and altered mammal distribution throughout the Midwest.

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