Nature's Storytellers

A Blog About Nature in Our DuPage Forest Preserves

Stephanie Touzalin

Stephanie Touzalin is an education specialist at the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County's Willowbrook Wildlife Center. Stephanie has a degree in natural resources and environmental science with a focus on fish-and-wildlife conservation and delivers programs about native animals to DuPage forest preserves.

Recent Posts

As the Seasons Change: A Soil Opera

on 12/2/20 8:15 AM By | Stephanie Touzalin | 0 Comments | Insider Plants Wildlife Nature native plant
Soil. Mud. Dirt. Earth. That stuff on the ground that’s always been there and always looks pretty much the same. Not too much happening down there, right? Wrong.
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Can't You Take Just One More? No, and Here's Why

on 5/8/20 10:30 AM By | Stephanie Touzalin | 0 Comments | Insider Wildlife Conservation Nature Rehabilitation
Every facility that cares for animals has to make tough decisions all the time: What type of animals should they treat? How many? Do they have the staff and skill to treat them? How should already limited resources be spread fairly among all the animals in need of help?
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Bald Eagle Reunited with its Family

A female bald eagle was returned to her home and family after 21 days of TLC at the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County’s Willowbrook Wildlife Center.
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Handling Spring Encounters with Nesting Geese

on 4/30/19 1:22 PM By | Stephanie Touzalin | 0 Comments | Insider Wildlife Nature
It’s that time of year when encounters escalate between people and aggressive Canada geese trying to protect their nests and families. But there are some simple ways for both to peacefully coexist.
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Mistaken Identity

Spring at a wildlife rehabilitation center means daily arrivals of baby animals. At Willowbrook Wildlife Center, our patient load skyrockets in the spring and summer months. Typically it is the baby bunnies, squirrels, ducklings, robin nestlings and raccoons that people are finding, but occasionally we will be surprised with a less common orphan.
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